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to learn that two provinces have developed regulations. i heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk about what he had learned as a mayor. he had been a central government official before and he realized once you got there, a central government officials do not understand a lives of ordinary people. and then he had to watch the proceedings and the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice. that was one of the first times in 35 or 40 years of going to china that i heard a chinese talk about procedural justice. the term is in the vocabulary. i think local experimentation may have the least helped in the increment the building of the change of legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of one of the american federal systems. the laboratories of the experiment. one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion, it is a large population. one virtue is that you can divide it into provinces and you can have real experiments. try this over here and try that over there. that is a tremendous v
part of this great country of ours, every region, small town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nations of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio secretary. >> i moved jon husted be designated as the ex-officio secretary of the 53rd electoral college. >> moving that mr. husted be designated. all those in favor by saying aye. opposed? ayes have it. mr. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we electors are about to cast our votes for president of the united states. the procedures are set forth in the 12th amendment of the united states constitution. separate votes are to be taken for each of us on separate ballots. after the votes have been cast and counted and the results announced,
. >> in the caesarian title, schilling has devastated large parts of the city, including a large suburbs. the rebels say they have also made gains in eastern syria. fighters say they have captured this oil field. tens of thousands of mainly sunni iraqis turned out to protest the government. they are accusing maliki of marginalizing sunni leaders. >> a sea of people gathering in the provincial capital. and there is mounting a, and mistrust of the government is -- anger is mounting, and protest of the government is deep. they have been protesting a week and are not going anywhere. >> our enemy once this gathering to be dispersed. this injustice is not only happening on the sunni, but our shia brothers as well. >> among the demands is an end to perceived discrimination. >> this government is targeting sunnis on purpose. they fear no god, and we do not trust them. >> these protesters are very angry. they are raising their demands every day. they are now calling to topple the government of newry maliki. they want the government to release the prisoners and to end the injustice in this country. they are also
and that cities are key to the economy. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, we've had high-profile examples of public-private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. one reason we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money, but to provide oversight, you have somebody to go to when you have a project, a regulator. an interlocutor. we should alloy private money. there's an additional problem. about so-called eminent domain. you can't just clear things out in china they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving. we're building a road here. you got to move out of your apartment tomorrow. we can't do that. it makes it trickier in our older cities to rebuild in the way they did in china. >> it's an interesting analo
you some of the figures. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. now, we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, but we've had some high-profile examples of public/private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. and by the way, one reason when he we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money but just to provide oversight and ombudsman so that you have somebody to go to when off project or regulator, an interlocutor perhaps. we should definitely allow private money. there is an additional problem, and richard probably knows more about this, about so-called eminent domain, where you can't just clear things out. in china, they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving, we're building here a road here. you have to move out of your parm tomorrow.
're seeing most of the growth in large cities. >> what about this gift from random house to all of its employees. pretty nice. >> yes, call it 50 shades of green, if you will. random house, which is the publisher of "50 shades of grey," the lascivious adult novel that's been all the rage this year, the company has seen major uptick in large part because of the book and soars. the ceo announced this week at the holiday party that every one of the employees will get a $5,000 bonus this year. that's really great news especially in the world of publishing, which has been sort of on a downward death spiral. >> that's really nice for them. well, great. thank you very much. morgan brennan. >> in today's one-minute play back. governor chris christie on "the daily show" the universal telethon for hurricane sandy victims and about meeting the boss bruce springsteen back stage. >> he came up, put his hands down. shook his hand. i tried to be cool. i wasn't. then he said, come on, give me a hug. i said, all right. i hugged him. >> did he go, come on, stop. >> no. you know, that's always hard to ju
's dozen large cities literally overnight. why didn't the numerous positive changes in indianapolis over the past 40 years, i see the fulfillment of the vision of then mayor dick lugar. not the midwest has a way of producing bad and the amended decency. none of us fall in that category. sometimes that sense is questioned, but we do have individuals who have the ability to see to the heart of the matter and find a way to resolve a problem. such scale is extremely valuable in the united states senate. a body by its very design is supposed to foster compromise between legislators on issues before the nation. and so it was a natural progression that following his success as mayor, dick lugar's next job would be serving hoosiers is the united states senator. since 1977, senator lugar has represented hoosiers have served our nation admirably. without question, senator lugar is the type of lawmakers later who works hard to bring both parties together, find common ground and pass the legislation. those contributions are many, including this fine valley service on the senate agriculture committee
in this country. we've done it in new york. this is the safest big city in the country. there are other large cities that are making real inroads against gun violence, but at the local level mayors and governors can't do it without leadership at the federal level, and, again, the passion and the comforting words from the president, they're important, but they're not nearly as important as the kind of leadership that he and congressman larson, his colleagues in congress, need to demonstrate now to get something done. >> congressman, before we go, i have to ask you, what factor do you think contributes the most to moving the ball forward on this? is it greater coverage in the media? is it more leadership from our politicians? what do you need to see to push for gun control reform in congress? >> well, clearly, clearly, it's all of the above, but most importantly, it's leadership from our elected officials. we are elected with a responsibility and a charge, and we have an obligation to speak out. if this were a terrorist attack and, frankly, i think these are domestic acts of terrorism. we would
proxies for medallions. they are required to operate cabs in many large cities including new york. the meters run higher than most other asset classes for decades. >> i don't think we ever thought it would hit a million dollar price. they have gone up 15% per year for 70 years. outperforming the dow, gold, nasdaq and real estate. >> his grandfather bought one of the badges for 10 bucks. 10,000% return since 1937. look at stock when you reinvest dividends, leaving s&p 500 behind in its rear view mirror. david: what do one cost? >> million bucks for the corporate guys. one million bucks or 700,000 for an individual. david: thanks, robert [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind aumatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi
ranked among the worst in the nation, even though the district was spending more per pupil than large u.s. cities, almost $13,000 per student. but in 2009, washington, d.c. became first in the nation to tie teacher salaries to student test scores under a program called "impact." teachers rated highly effective can get annual bonuses up to $25,000 if they stay at that achievement level for two straight years, they can also get a base salary increase of $20,000. a highly effective teacher can earn $76,000, the first year, and reach $131,000 in just nine years. less effective teachers earn 51,000 to start and are fired if they get poor involveses for two straight years. this year, 98 teachers were fired for poor performance. but nathan saunders, president of the washington teachers union, says the system is unfair to teachers when many of their student have barriers to learning, such as poverty. >> the penalties are so immediate and so painful, not just immediate in terms of their paycheck, but also immediate in terms of their careers. >> reporter: in washington, test scores are still amon
medallions are required to operate cabs in many large cities including new york. they were first issued in the big apple during the great depression. >> back in 1937, this little piece of tin sold for $10 each. >> his grandfather bought one of the first badges and medallion financial was born. the company has seen quite a return on that first investment and on hundreds more medallions it bought since then. back in the late '70s when the checker cabs were cruising the streets of new york city, a taxi medallion would set you back less than $100,000. now this piece of metal on the front of your cab will set you back more than a million bugs. >> i don't think we ever thought it would hit a million dollar price. they have gone up 15% per year, 70 years. outperforming dow, gold, nasdaq, real estate. you name it. >> analysts marvel at the company's track record. unlike most banks, medal i don't know never had default on taxi loan. >> real estate lending someone defaults it is years before banks get money back. it is terrific collateral. the medallion is the little tin. if somebody doesn't pay
. in westchester county two large cities, yonkers and vernon. [talking over each other] >> of those 80% of people with legal handguns were they in tending and plotting who they were going to attack or were they on the street? what was the climate? >> various array of different crimes but now what we have is crimes tend >> with technology. stuart: i will break in for a second. i want to give you breaking news from the environmental protection agency. the administrator lisa jackson says she will step down. she has been on the job four years. she announced her departure in a statement that came out today. no particular reason for leaving but she says she was ready for new challenges, time with a family and opportunity to make a difference. lisa jackson, administrator of the epa will step down. back to you for a second, peter. we have a list published in the newspaper. everyone who knows where the legal handguns are in each house, name and address of the person who has got them. in newton, conn. we had a dreadful case of legally hunt handguns used to the terrible way by someone who was clearly mental
more local or large city looks david roeder rights for the sun times, one of my favorites and put out a piece a couple days ago where he took three washington policy institutes and put together some of their research. he found if you just looked at large cities foreclosures were about 6% but the record is 6.1%. if you loosked at just chicago 8.7% foreclosure rate versus a year ago, year over year at 8.8. so only 0.1 better. if you specifically looked at cook county, their third quarter prices were down 3% year over year. you have the good, the bad, and it gets very difficult to just come up with one lump sum. one thing we can walk away with, it seems as though housing has bottomed. many states deal with the core process of foreclosures and there have been breakthroughs there. i've talked with many experts who really think there is still a shadow inventory of foreclosures that are going to be freed into 2013. you try to figure it out. the last, well maybe this is the credit market side of a possible positive for u.s. treasuries or some of the good ones like boon's. there's a "wall stre
you, judge. >> new studies shows stall construction projects are on the rise in america's large of the city. according to a new report from builders there are hundreds of vacant lots and half finished projects around new york city despite all of them having the necessary permits for construction. now the news from brooklyn. that is this about? >>guest: well, there are e monuments in a bad economy. a finish which is one of several hundrednd at the city like that where the construction just stops. the workers are one day and suddenly they never show up again and they are e and quiet for years. this is a legacy of the 2008 financial crisis having to do with long-term institutional borrowing and lending and that is a problem. look at the numbers: 691 inactive sites up 17 percent in new york city since february. 45 percent dormant since 1999. it is run out of money or a combination of running out or fought having enough sales or the market for rentals does not appear to be strong enough to justify completion. >>guest: the american institute of architects are putting together develope
of this great country of ours, every region, small-town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nation's of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound bite. thank you. -- and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio official. >> i moved jon hustend be designated as the axle official secretary of the 53rd electoral college. bemoving that mr. husted designated. all those in favor by seeing aye. opposed? ayes have it. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we elect torrors are about to ct our votes for president of the united states. the procedures are set forth in the 12th amendment. separate of votes are to be taken for each of us on separate ballots. after the votes have been cast and counted and the results announced come electors will sig
developed regulations. i heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk about what he had learned as a mayor. he had been a central government official before and he realized once you got there, a central government officials do not understand a lives of ordinary people. and then he had to watch the proceedings and the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice. that was one of the first times in 35 or 40 years of going to china that i heard a chinese talk about procedural justice. the term is in the vocabulary. i think local experimentation may have the least helped in the increment the building of the change of legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of one of the american federal systems. the laboratories of the experiment. one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion, it is a large population. one virtue is that you can divided into provinces and you can have real experiments. try this over here and try that over there. that is a tremendous virtue. i read in your book, you h
be if it were launched on the western city of homs in syria. a large swath of the city would be impacted by a single shell. it's estimated 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are now talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario. because if there were to be, god forbid, a chemical attack, the concern is some of that could drift across boreder ed. worse, even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the borders into the neighbors countries and you would have a full-fledged crisis in the region. >> there has been talk that assad may try and seek asylum. what are you being told about that and the possibiliti
in 1998 he bequested five large evergreen trees to the city and those trees were planted at washington square park in may of last year. this legislation again would allow us to accept a gift of this plaque to really commemorate his efforts and what he was able to do to create some greenery in one of the densest and least green spaces in san francisco. >> thank you. so, if there are no questions, let's open it for public comment. is there anyone from the public that would like to speak? seeing none, public comment is closed. so, colleagues, can we move this forward without objection? thank you. and, mr. evans, can you please call item number 2? >> item number 2 is an ordinance amending the san francisco environmental code to suspend the yellow pages distribution pilot program. >> thank you. and the sponsor is president david choo. >> thank you, colleagues. as i mentioned at roll call a couple weeks ago, a year and a half ago, we voted 10 to 1 to approve a three-year pilot program to reduce environmental waste and blight from the over distribution of yellow page phone book. i want to tha
highest violent crime rate of any middle to large-sized city in the country. so you've got a couple things here. you have chosen a path. you said you know what? we like the idea that the democrats are giving to us and you have gone down this path for 50 years and you have nothing to show for it but despair. a bailout is not going to solve your problem. think about what you are doing when you go to vote. would a bailout be a gift, with someone saying straighten your life out now. stuart: i agree with you. this is surely a larger picture here. if detroit wants it and appeals to the president to get some money because they voted for the president, what about california? what about illinois? what about any other of the states which voted overwhelmingly for president obama and are in dire financial shape? it could open the door. quick comment? sandra: absolutely. i think this could be the big change over the next four years, if you hear more cries for help, and they don't get it, maybe that's when the republican party starts to look pretty good. stuart: that will be interesting. next we will sh
still has a huge presence in baghdad. the u.s. embassy there is as large as vatican city with almost 200 american troops providing embassy security and handling sales of u.s. arms to the iraqis. it may be a preview of the future of afghanistan in which the united states is pushing ahead with plans to withdraw troops by 2014. the defense secretary leon panetta says our longest war is at a strategic turning point with a new strategy which has reversed five-year trends of growing violence. he says military commanders there are now expressing optimism. >> all of them believe that we have fundamentally turned the tide in that effort after years in which we lacked the right strategy and the necessary resources to try to achieve the mission we were embarked on. >> shepard: the u.s. still has about 65,000 troops in afghanistan. >>> secretary panetta is talking about the attack object the u.s. outpost in benghazi just hours after more classified hearings on capitol hill. that attack killed the u.s. ambassador to libya, chris stevens and three other americans. now the state department is sending l
will be doing great. the coastal cities, again, largely rain and travel delays will be impacted significantly where we have new york, philly and d.c. >> sounds like retailers can't catch a brick right now. superstorm system and now the storm is barreling its way across the country and with holiday pale at their weakest, heard that this morning, do retailers, can they make up for last yund. >> thank you. have, why don't you go first. what impact is it going to have? >> you have declining dispose al income and petter problems. you have the retailers that have inconspicuous stock and consumers are concerned about everything from hurricane sandy and the senseless slaughters in sandy hook, connecticut, spending less and giving more to charities. >> jan, i don't want to minimize any of this, the damage that this storm has already inflicted in parts of the country and could still inflict, but we were in an environment where people were just not shopping to begin with. do you think retailers could use this as a good excuse going forward? >> yeah, bert's here with me the four horsemen and apocalypse.
guns in their homes. and you can figure out when may not. it is a local new york city wit large circulation, they are saying that the gun control and the happening of newtown, connecticut are in the minds of this readers. so they published a map of where all handgun owners live. on the journal news website, all you have to do is zoom into a neighborhood and the locations of any gun permit holders will show up with red dots tap a dot, and the name and address of the permit holder pop up. the newspaper got the data by filing freedom of information requests with the clerks of the county. they do not indicate whether the residents own the guns just that they are legally able to. and homes are shot guns and rifles are not included because in those counties those can be bought but permits. but the news has brought backlash. the same complaint was made by some readers. i think aforesait was an irresp thing for them the to do. it's saying to robbers go to the home next door, they do not have a gun. or thieves that want to steal the guns will know where to get them. at this store, i spok
.m. a large area, but not the city or southern or eastern suburbs. the area in blue denotes the snow. the light blue is very light snow. a little purple mix, and then the green is rain. we're on track forecasting snow north and west of the city. mostly rain south and east of the city before wraps up in the afternoon. by the time it wraps up, we may see an inch or so in the metro area. to adjust to4 inches it will turn wendy and a lot cooler the day on it will turn wendyindy and cold on sunday. next seven days shows a sunny and cold new year's eve, a cold new year's day with a chance of a few showers. let's go live to the white house with president obama. >> for the past couple of months, i've been working with leaders of both parties to try to forge an agreement to build our economy and shrink the deficit. the ballast planned and cut spending in a responsible way that would also ask the wealthiest americans to pay a little more. i still want to get this done. it is the right thing to do for families, our businesses, and our entire economy. but the allure for immediate action is here
in bethesda but the wider washington area? >> i think the washington area as one of the greatest cities in the country, probably the world. as large as it is and powerful it is because of the federal government it is still very community focus. therere are very few people that i or my fellow of the directors did not know. so, the opportunity to meet people is constant. there are many nights i am out meeting with people. as big of a community it is, it really is a small community. now we are actively expanding into the northern virginia marketplace and we are really replicating exactly whwhat we did 14 years ago in montgomery county and i it is a new challenge for us to be able to get to know the people in northern virginia, which we feel is a terrific opportunity. >> said irk you that a town -- doesn't work you in any way in a town that has so many business leaders, who make up the business community, that it gets overshadowed by being the nation's capital and the fedal governmentnt -- sometimes is seen as a one-industry to? an interesting you bring it up. we do a lot ofoad shows in th
a largely black city, you saw folks going out to the suburbs. dollars going with them. that's the struggle. >> it's a struggle, but is the message at the end of your film hopeful or depressing? >> well, it's realistic. we're not saying that detroit is over, it can't rise again. we're saying please double down on detroit. please focus on a lot of us our cities going bankrupt and infrastructural problems in detroit. it's not a message of it's all going to be fine but if people ban together and we focus on places like detroit, of course, there's hope. >> you talk to so many people that are struggling. what did they say they want to get done and how do they expect it to get done? >> they want basic -- i think they want a basic quality of life. they really do. at this point it's donning on them that it's never going to be the way it used to be but they want to have a basic life and that their kids will have at least as good a life as they have. >> what we're seeing in greece is what's happening in detroit. austerity cuts. >> we're seeing a big bailout -- >> right. >> starting with the auto indu
have adopted the regulations, namely -- and i went there and heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk at what he had learned as a mayor. he'd been a central government official before he was posted down and he realized once he got there, the central government officials don't really understand the lives of ordinary people. and then he began to watch the proceedings, the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation, and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice that was one of the first times in 35, 40 years of going to china at her to chinese talk about procedural justice. i think that the term is in the vocabulary, and i think that local experimentation may at least help in the incremental building of a changed legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of the american federal system, is called the brandeis, called the laboratories of experiment. now, one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion is it a very big population. it's hard to govern. at one virtue of is you can divide into parts and provinces, and you rea
show these underwater creatures draw large crowds, drive more than $300 million to the city and state and help maintain over 3300 jobs. >> it helps us to understand really the impact that we're making in the community. >> reporter: the aquarium commission report comes just as the nonprofit receives a grant from the state to help renovate its rate trade exhibit. >> the 2.5 million dollars that the state made available to us, to help support that project is very, very important. to us, remaining vital and relevant. really providing new things for our visitors. >> the report also shows that after people who come to the national aquarium annually. >> what does that mean for marylanders? how do they benefit? >> because people are coming from out of town, money that they earn elsewhere that they're spending here. so everyone from maryland benefits from that. >> reporter: translation, out- of-towners spend money funneled right back here to our city. our very own backyard. >> and because there have been so many out-of-towners visiting the aquarium
the wind and rain. city crews work into the night cutting tree that toppled as a this tree started making cracking noises at 5:00 a.m. in front of rob porter's home. >> and then there was a large -- probably five minutes after the crack lig, a huge thud. >> in all the department of public works cleaned up the trees. it is real busy. >> this latest storm spared no neighborhood. it was snapped near moraga street. there was sig president cay -- significant street flooding. two large branches landed on one of the thoroughfares. and in city heights, a tree uprooted taking part of the street with it. a prius on the street was also damaged. >> you can replace a car, and some of the streets have been here 80 years. >> despite the loss of some trees, the city says as little property damage and no injuries. although at this home, the family dog did come close to getting hurt. a large tree belonging to the house two doors down came crashing down on their backyard. >> i was thankful it didn't land on my dog. that would be tragic. i am glad he ran. he has big, long legs so he could run. >> the departm
the vapor with a long sweep of his arms. mark twain had acquired a steam bath in virginia city. while laboring under bronchitis and a series called, 8 miles northwest from the road between virginia city and steamboat springs, a distance of 7 miles. over a long line of beautiful columns, there was a large house constructed to be then. [inaudible] gave me a boiling and surging noise exactly as a steam steamboat bed. sawyer traded and a hot mess. the boards were damp from the sweat running down his arms. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy. new york engine company number 14. san francisco had grown and battled fire under chief david broderick and first fire chief. he served with other engine houses and toiled as a steamboat engineer in the mexican tea tray. mark twain, who held strong opinions perked up when sawyer mentioned he had worked as a steamboat engineer. the question and the boy in the steamer environment, such a job, he said knowingly. in the boiling steam room, he pointed out the suffocating temperature of the furnace room in a narrow space between two rows of furnace
of debris from drainage pipe that carry storm water to the lower level of the city. trying to prevent a large back that up could unleash a torrent of potentially destructive water. >> more than anything we have seen in the last 15 years. saturation levels in the hillside creating a lot of flow throughout the lower levels. >>reporter: nearby there has been a nagging flow of water through frank hererra sky light into the kitchen. >> call the contractor hope to get him over here next day to see what he has to say and hopefully they can order up a new part. the tarp is coming. before the next storm definitely. >>reporter: only kern boulevard they scrape out junk and the metal great id that goes that the station. >> gets full of grass and clean it tout make sure the pump able to run. >>reporter: the pump take all the run off from city streets and flush it into the bay. willow tree topple on hillside on valley view avenue. wasn't particularly big but the branches may have created a natural dam lead ing into a drain pipe. >> always looks better than a fallen down tree. they just recent
taking over a large percentage of our city. a lot of it was non for profits. i have had a good working relationship with people in the state governments. it is good to have them close. i can see what they're doing and to buy and put and see what i can do for the people of the city. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: we turn our attention to unemployment insurance and how it can be impacted. joining us for the discussion is josh . caller: it is a combination of a federal and state program. it usually lasts -- it can be extended up to 93 weeks. it is the extension be on the six month time frame we're talking about as part of the fiscal cliff tops. host: that is what might be caught -- cut? guest: that is what automatically expires. president obama has said as part of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. republicans have not taken a firm stand. we have seen in the past obama has had to make a deal on taxes. host: what specific benefits do these programs provide? guest: usually some kind o
and privilege it is to serves as the transportation director in this great city. we ordered san francisco weather to deep the dust down and we are in a construction site and it's a great time for transportation across the nation largely because of some of the folks you will hear who are to my left and your right. it is also a great time to be in san francisco because we have leadership here in the city that are encouraging innovation, that recognize the importance of investment and infrastructure, and there is no better manifestation of that than this project and that prt is man manifested in a way that i can see no more strongly in our great mayor who have been been a public works director, a city administrator, and helped build the city's plan he really gets this stuff. he is really engaged in this stuff. i don't think a week has come gone by that he hasn't asked me when this day is coming and it's a pleasure to introduce our mayor ed lee. >> thank you for your wonderful leadership. over 20-25 years ago when we were struggling with the earthquake, when people in chinatown
army is trying to organize the tent city, but they lack the money, experience, and personnel to take care of such a large group of people. >> from morning at 7:00 evening, this is for five people, for a family. >> he is living with his family of 17 in an old tent. >> the rain was terrible. everything -- really everything got wet. even our mattresses. hopefully, my children will not get sick, too. >> basil is trying to provide the children at the camp with education, teaching them how to read, write, and drop. the children's drawings illustrate the impact of the war on their lives and the months many have spent in the camp. >> this is the helicopter of b ashar al assad. until a few months ago, about 5000 people live here. now there are four times that number. the refugees are glad to have a roof over their heads. osama hassan from aleppo spent months in a tent. >> i just wanted to get over the border. a turkish border soldiers shot me in the leg without warning. they are not letting anyone through any more. >> it is hard for the syrian air force because of its proximity to the border.
, and eight miles northwest, but the row between virginia city and steamboat swings and a distance of seven miles. over the first daylong line of 9 beautiful columns the bottom constricted large house debate in. he likened the jets of steam needed for fissures in the ears with steamboats. they made a boiling, surging noise exactly as a steamboat did. he enjoyed placing them in a handkerchief and dipping them where they would soft boiled in two minutes or hardboiled in four depending on this move. sawyer of luxuriated in the hot mist, answered his column, the cards which were murky, and the baseboards were damp and the fresh bottles of dark beer were cold. in his 32 years slayer had been a porche boy. in the new york fire engine co. no. 14. and the first fire chief. sawyer served with the other engine houses and toiled as a steamboat engineer flying the mexican sea trade. mark twain perked up when sawyer mentioned he was a steamboat engineer. the journalists, and danny boy who dreamed of shipping as a steamer or fireman, such a job he said knowingly has little drawbacks and the boiling steam
government figures, among the authority figures, and among society at large. >> afghan war victims have filed a class action suit against germany in a court in the western city of bonn. >> those claims are related to an air strike ordered by a german officer in northern afghanistan in 2009, which killed 90 civilians. germany had given some compensation to the victims' families without admitting responsibility. >> lawyers representing survivors of the air strike are demanding higher compensation -- more than 3 million euros in total. they complain the settlements arrived at immediately following the attack were too small. as far as the german government is concerned, the case is closed. >> 5000 u.s. dollars was paid in over 90 instances. this money was transferred to an account in afghanistan. the account was specifically designed to compensate these families. >> on september 4, 2009, a u.s. f-15 fighter jets bombed two fuel tankers, killing more than 90 civilians. a german officer called in the air strike based on faulty intelligence. the political repercussions were extensive. the german def
. the prosecution wanted to be sentenced to life in prison and to be given a large fine. an endangered whale of its washed up on a remote beach of queens in new york city. the 18 meter mammal is a finback whale. it's not known why it beached itself, but it looks like it had been sick for while. here are some chinese shoppers getting more than they bargained for. the security camera caught this. dozens of turtles and small fish and three dozen sharks died. 15 people were injured by the falling glass. animal conservationists say that there could be an answer to bringing back the white rhino from near extinction. are only seven of these left in the world and four of them live in kenya. >> they are the barista large mammals in the world. these northern white rhinos have spent most of their lives in a concrete area in the czech republic. them freedom,en but they are under constant threat from poachers. conservationists think this could be the solution, an unmanned drone designed to monitor tornadoes. each rhino will be tagged so the sensors can recognize individual animals and use on board gps to store
the next two years, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. that's exactly it. we want local entrepreneurs to take advantage of the faster seed that google fiber will bring and develop. you know, the sky is the limit. >> and how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. now we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment, for top talent to come, stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day, if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding an aunt ru pentrepreneu to take a risk and do that in your community is going to grow jobs and grow the economy. >> for now, dreams are driving wild on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas. >>
to hold on to customer. >> we have seen circuit city, borders the bookstore go out of business largely because of competition with amazon and there are a number of smaller retailers that have closed down because they couldn't compete with m son. >> amazon was started in the mid 19950 to sell books online and made no profit. but it became clear that the founder said his notoriously secretive company had bigger plans. it expanded in the 1990s into electronics, business services, information storage. amazon turned the corner to profitability in 2002 and today amazon is a $100 billon global company. and though basal has declineded our request for an interview, he recently told for june magazine-snow. >> we like to find is there somebody out there doing some element better than we? two it and if so, how do we improve? >> reporter: while that may be good news for millions of consumers who enjoy amazon's low prices, it is daunting for many businesses, even though that call amazon a partner. >> it's a wolf in sheep's clothing is probably the better wie to describe it. >> this woman is a retail
city and steam boat springs -- a distance of 7 miles. over the first of a long line of nine beautiful columns, nevada cans had constructed a large house to bathe in. twain likened the jets of hot, white steam amid from fissures in the earth to a steam boat's escape pipes. they made a boiling, surging noise exactly as a steamboat did. he enjoyed placing eggs in his handkerchief and dipping them in the springs where they would soft boil in two minutes or or hard boil in four depending upon his mood. sawyer luxury rated in the hot mist and surveyed his cards which were murky in the haze. the pace boards were damp from the sweat running down his arms, but the fresh bottles of dark beer stall had sent in were cold. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy in the new york fire engine company number 14 and in san francisco had run and battled fire for broderick 1 under chief david broderick, the city's first volunteer fire company and first fire chief. sawyer served with other engine houses and toiled as a steamboat engineer mying the mexicans -- plying the mexicans -- [inaudible] trade.
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